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Indiana Raptor Center Visitation Guidelines for the Remainder of 2021

The Board of Directors at Indiana Raptor Center elected to open the InRC facility for limited tours in 2021. At the time of this update, remaining weeks for our visits include September 1-October 15, and October 30-November 15. To accommodate Covid concerns and to maintain a quality and safe experience for everyone, there are some restrictions we do need to place on these activities as follows:

  1. To respect social distancing recommendations, tours may contain no more than 10 guests, preferably less. Tours of single families are encouraged.
  2. ALL GUESTS MUST WEAR MASKS DURING THE TOURS. Please bring your own or purchase them at the CVS in town (available on a limited basis).
  3. People arriving without masks will be rescheduled.
  4. Please bring your own HAND SANITIZER – we have a limited amount we can share with you but appreciate you bringing your own.
  5. As usual tours are only available BY APPOINTMENT.
  6. Tours cannot include children under the age of 6, and all children must wear masks as well.
  7. Also as usual, the address of the center and other pertinent information will be given out at the time that reservations are made.
  8. There are no public restrooms at the center, but we can recommend locations to you when you call for an appointment.
  9. We reserve the right to reschedule your tour at your convenience in case of inclement weather, or illnesses affecting the tour guides.
  10. The center is, first and foremost, an avian hospital, so we ask that people please use “indoor voices” when touring. Smoking and alcohol are not permitted on the grounds. Children need to be managed by parents; no running or gravel throwing please!
  11. Tours are completely outdoors, and pathways are covered in gravel, so please dress appropriately and wear closed shoes rather than sandals, for your own comfort.
  12. Visitors are not allowed to touch any of the birds. This is a law established by US Fish and Wildlife Services. However, photos are certainly permitted.
    To those who find these rules restrictive, may I point out that the center is not on business property but is located on private property containing the home of two of the board’s officers. We hope you can respect our desire to keep our home covid-free, especially as our family contains members with compromised conditions such as diabetes and cancer survival. We also want to protect YOU from other people who may be on the property at the same time!

Please call for further information and reservations at 812-988-8990.
We appreciate your patience with these rules and decisions and hope that all of you and your friends, families and colleagues can remain healthy and safe during this time of difficulty for people everywhere. May we all be kind to one another in the face of this health threat to the entire world and take seriously all calls for caution and restraint in public interactions.

We continue with our primary mission, to take in injured birds. If that decision changes temporarily, we will notify through the website and a voicemail message at our 812-988-8990 number.


All actions will be taken with staff, volunteers, visitors, off-site audiences, bird finders, and birds in mind.

Very Best Regards,
Patti Reynolds
President/Executive Director

Raptor Gifts for the Holidays!

It’s that time of year again, and if you’ve got raptor lovers in your life, we’ve got a shop for you! The Indiana Raptor Center runs a shop on the popular website Redbubble where you can buy a number of fetching tees, prints, mugs, tote bags, and more. Offering a selection of both illustrated designs and photographs, we think there’s something for every lover of birds of prey. Plus, your purchases help us in our unending mission to rescue, rehabilitate, and release injured and orphaned raptors.


We’ve added some new products this year as well! You can find products featuring our logos as well as our popular “barn owl and Triceratops” patch design! Head to the shop to browse the selection.

Vulture Awareness Day!

Today is Vulture Awareness Day around the world. Vultures may not be the most popular birds among the general public, but they are vital members of the environment. They are facing a range of pressures around the world, most famously from diclofenac poisoning.

A few years ago, I accompanied Patti Reynolds and stalwart volunteer/ house taxidermist Markus to retrieve and injured Turkey Vulture. Her wing injury would prove to be of the sort that just can’t be fixed, but Markus, Patti, and Laura gave the bird their all in hopes of a good outcome. It is so often the case that the stresses these birds encounter before entering Indiana Raptor Center’s care prove to be too much, and the best that can be done is to provide a safe, stress-free environment for their passing.

Patti and Markus rescue an injured Turkey Vulture

Patti and Markus rescue an injured Turkey Vulture

An injured Turkey Vulture, rescued by Indiana Raptor Center

An injured Turkey Vulture, rescued by Indiana Raptor Center

Laura Edmunds and Patti Reynolds tend to an injured Turkey Vulture

Laura Edmunds and Patti Reynolds tend to an injured Turkey Vulture

It was exciting to watch my first bird rescue. For my part, I got to hold a big net and help form a perimeter so Patti and Markus could nab her. She had not eaten recently, and therefore couldn’t manage the trademarked defense-by-repulsion method Turkey Vultures favor: good old-fashioned puke.

Bird rescue and rehabilitation is a tireless occupation, with many heartbreaks along the way. Please donate to Indiana Raptor Center to help us rescue and care for these birds, and if you cannot attend our Raptor Rendezvous fundraiser on September 12, 2015, please consider purchasing a ticket for a local first responder!

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Raptor Art Spotlight: Avery

Our friend Avery is our featured artist for July-August. Avery is a bright talented 8 year old Hoosier who is a good friend of the Indiana Raptor Center. Her artwork displays an observational power, and the budding skills to reproduce those observations, that are well beyond her years. Jack Wittenbrink, our supporting metal and papercut artist from New Orleans thinks she is something of a prodigy because her drawings depict correct anatomical features in proper proportion, while also putting the light of life, curiosity and spirit into the birds she draws. We are happy to have her as a friend, and will continue to feature her work on this website as long as she continues to grace us with more drawings!

A pencil drawing of a screech owl

A pencil drawing of a screech owl by young artist Avery

A pencil drawing of a parrot

A drawing of a parrot by young artist Avery

A pencil drawing of a barn owl in flight

A pencil drawing of a barn owl in flight by young artist Avery

A pencil drawing of a barn owl with a mouse

Barn owl with mouse, by young artist Avery.

Raptor Art Spotlight: Steve Goad

For our second post featuring beautiful raptor art, we turn our eye to Steve Goad. Hailing from Texas, Steve makes his living as a full-time artist and has worked quite a bit in the video game and publishing industries. His body of work includes still life, landscapes, and charismatic renderings of comic, sci-fi, and fantasy characters, but our focus here today will be on a his lovely raptors.

Red-Tailed Hawk by Steve Goad

Red-Tailed Hawk, © Steve Goad. Shared here with the artist’s permission.

Freedom Haze by Steve Goad

Freedom Haze, © Steve Goad. Shared here with the artist’s permission.

Golden Eagle portrait, by Steve Goad

Golden Eagle portrait, © Steve Goad. Shared here with the artist’s permission.

To follow Steve’s work, please like his Facebook page, follow him on DeviantArt, purchase high-quality prints at Fine Art America, and of course head over to his professional website. We’d like to thank Steve for allowing us to share his work here and for also bringing his artistic talents to bear in these gorgeous renderings of birds of prey.

Raptor Art Spotlight: Claudia Hahn

Birds of prey inspire awe in us, and that awe often finds expression in works of art. Indiana Raptor Center’s Nashville headquarters are a virtual art gallery! To celebrate our appreciation of and respect for artists who create inspiring raptor art of all sorts – from felting to mixed media to comics to illustration – we’re beginning a regular series of artist spotlights here at our new website. Illustrator Claudia Hahn has agreed to be our first subject.

Claudia is a native of Germany, but now calls England home. She describes herself as “an enthusiastic fossil hunter and birdwatcher, a lover of owls,” and can even boast that she once “was the brief owner of a pet magpie.” She is especially interested in working on conservation projects, stemming from her deep appreciation of natural history. This love of the natural world comes through loud and clear in her work, as you will see in the selected pieces below.

First, we’ll start with a couple of owl species we’re well-acquainted with in the midwestern United States: the Barn Owl and Barred Owl.

'Twilight in the Highlands', original oil painting by Claudia Hahn

‘Twilight in the Highlands,’ original oil painting by Claudia Hahn

'Barred Owl,' reproduction of a painting by Claudia Hahn

‘Barred Owl,’ reproduction of a painting by Claudia Hahn

Claudia’s anatomical studies are as enchanting as her illustrations of live birds, as in this study of a wing.

Reproduction of 'Bones', anatomical study by Claudia Hahn

Reproduction of ‘Bones,’ anatomical study by Claudia Hahn

Naturally, she also focused on raptors exotic to us, as in this incredible portrait of a Red Kite.

'The Red Kite,' original painting by Claudia Hahn

‘The Red Kite,’ original painting by Claudia Hahn

We hope you’ve enjoyed Claudia’s work and will follow her on social media: follow her at her artist website and portfolio, as well as on Twitter, Facebook, DeviantArt, and Tumblr. Even better, check out Claudia’s Etsy Shop where you can purchase originals and/ or prints of the works I’ve shared here and many more works that explore other facets of the natural world.

All images in this post © Claudia Hahn and used with her permission.